A British Gay Rights Activist Attempted Citizen's Arrest on Zimbabwean President in 1999!

Peter Tatchell and three members of his activist rights group called OutRage! Went to Zimbabwe on October 30th 1999 in order to arrest Robert Mugabe of murder, detainment without trial and abuse of gay human rights.

Peter and his activist group that included Alistair Williams, Chris Morris and John Hunt ran up to the Zimbabwean President's motorcade during his private shopping trip.

They grabbed his arm stating, "President Mugabe, you are under arrest for torture. Torture is a crime under international law."

Peter Thatchell was referencing section 134 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988.

Peter then turned to Robert Mugabe's bodyguards and demanded that they called the police. While the four ended up being arrested, detained, Robert Mugabe was allowed to leave.

The OutRage! activists were then taken to court in November in London and pleaded not guilty. The charges against the activists were then dropped.

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Nintendo wanted Mario to ride Yoshi since the NES. It took 6 years for technology to make the concept possible!

Mario creator Shigeru Miyamoto had wanted Mario to ride a dinosaur since just after the completion of the very first Super Mario Bros. game, but it took 6 years due to technology limits. 

If you’re a Mario fan, you probably know Yoshi’s first appearance was in Super Mario World, the first Mario game for the Super Nintendo. Unbeknownst to most, though, Yoshi had been around for several years already. 

Just after the first game came out in 1985, Miyamoto had wanted Mario to ride a dinosaur in a following game, but as he explained, the technology to have a player be able to activate and hop onto a totally different control scheme just wasn’t there. 

The NES wasn’t really powerful enough. But Yoshi finally came around in 1990 (1991 in the US). To date he is one of the more popular Mario characters, and along with Wario and Donkey Kong, has had his own successful franchise. 

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After they died, the musicians from the Titanic were billed for their uniforms!

Most of us know the story of the RMS Titanic's on-board orchestra.

Specifically that, once the ship began to sink, the musicians continued to perform in hopes of keeping passengers calm as they were loaded into lifeboats.

These men, the brave Theodore Ronald Brailey, Roger Marie Bricoux, John Frederick Preston Clarke, Wallace Hartley, John Law Hume, Georges Alexandre Krins, Percy Cornelius Taylor, and John Wesley Woodward, played until the end, giving up their own lives to comfort hundreds more.

However, not everyone knows what happened after their tragic death.

These musicians were contracted by Liverpool firm C.W. & F.N. Black, who provided musicians for most British ships. And, for whatever reason, the firm did not have insurance to cover their Titanic performers.

Because of this, after the tragedy, C.W. and F.N. sent the following letter to the father of John Hume:

"We shall be obliged if you will remit us the sum of 5s. 4d., which is owing to us as per enclosed statement.

We shall also be obliged if you will settle the enclosed uniform account."

Hume's father did not settle the bill, instead choosing to reprint the letter in the Amalgamated Musicians Union's monthly newsletter, where it caused quite a stir.

It's incredible how heartless some people can be when money enters the picture.

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If the New York Public School System was a city, it would be the 10th largest in the US!

It's easy to forget how many students there are in the United States.

New York City is, unsurprisingly, the largest city in the United States. Holding over 8 million people, there's a reason the Big Apple is seen by many as America's cultural epicenter.

However, it is also the center of American primary education.

With over 1700 schools and 1 million students, the New York City Public School System is the largest compulsory education organization in the United States.

In fact, if the New York Public School System was a city in itself, it would be the tenth largest in America, putting it behind Dallas, San Diego, San Antonio, Phoenix, Philadelphia, Houston, Chicago, Los Angeles and, of course, New York City.

Sadly, it is also one of the most segregated school systems in the country. According to The New York Times, the New York City Public School System features a large amount of systematic discrimination against Hispanic, Asian, and black students, a trend that has continued even after housing segregation has diminished.

The New York City Public School System is part of the state's Department of Education. It is currently run by Schools Chancellor Carmen Faria.

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In 1954, archaeologists found a statue of the Buddha in this 8th-century Swedish viking settlement!

In 1954, archaeologists unearthed an early viking settlement on Sweden's island of Helg. In this settlement, they found a number of interesting objects. Most notable of these was a small statue of the Buddha.

Though it is possible one of the settlement's vikings was a practicing Buddhist, it is also possible that the statue was taken during a viking raid.

Buddhism is a nontheistic religion based on the teachings of Siddhartha Gautama, more commonly referred to as the Buddha or "the awakened one". Alive during the birth of philosophy, the Buddha shared the spotlight with such great thinkers as Lao-Tse, Confucius, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.

Buddhists believe in the Four Noble Truths, which are as follows:

1. Dukkha, that life is filled with unsatisfactoriness 2. Samudaya, that dukkha is caused by craving and ignorance 3. Nirodha, that there is a cure for dukkha 4. Magga, that the cure for dukkha is following the Noble Eightfold Path.

To follow the Noble Eightfold Path means that one has Right Understanding, Thought, Speech, Action, Livelihood, Effort, Mindfulness, and Concentration.

I wonder if those vikings' ships were fitted with a Dharma wheel...

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