MIT students developed a wristband that can regulate the body's temperature, thereby possibly eliminating the need for central heating and cooling in the future!

Sam Shames is a MIT senior who faced a rather common problem.

His body temperature usually runs hot and his mom's usually runs cold and, between the two of them, it was not easy to decide where to set the thermostat in a room when they were both occupying the same space.

He figured there must be a way where everybody can just live in peace and be comfortable at the same time, so he did some research.

He came across scientific papers that explained that heating or cooling certain parts of the body have an effect on how cold or warm we think we are.

Suddenly he asked the right question: Why, instead of heating or cooling a space with central air conditioning, don’t we just heat or cool our own bodies?

That is how he and a team of other students started working on ‘Wristify," a thermoelectric bracelet that uses alternating pulses of hot or cold to regulate the temperature of the person wearing it.

The ‘Wristify’ prototype won first place at the MADMEC, an annual competition put on by the school’s Materials Science and Engineering program.

In the U.S. alone air conditioning accounts for 16.5 percent of energy use. If ‘Wristify’ becomes available for public use, it will certainly contribute to lessening the energy problem the world is currently facing, because you will not need air conditioning if you can control your body’s temperature!

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in 1955, a plaster buddha statue more than 600 years old was dropped during an attempt to move it to a new location. Some plaster came off, revealing a solid gold statue underneath.

Dropping a statue when trying to move it is usually disastrous. In 1954, however, the complete opposite happened.

When trying to move a seemingly mundane (but heavy) statue of Buddha, it was dropped, peeling off some of the plastic to reveal a statue of solid gold!

It instantly became the largest solid gold statue in the world at almost 10 feet tall and 5.5 tons. The statue is estimated at $250 million.

The statue is called Phra Phuttha Maha Suwan Patimakon, or more commonly, Golden Buddha. Based on the style of the statue, it’s thought to have been made in the 13th or 14th century.

It’s believed that it was covered in plaster before the fall of the destruction of Ayutthaya kingdom by Burmese invaders in 1767 in order to prevent it from being stolen.

The ploy worked, and the statue remained among ruins until the 19th century.

At that point the Thai King Buddha Yodfa Chulaloke (Rama I) ordered that various old Buddha images should be brought to Bangkok from the ruined temples around the country.

They moved the unusually heavy “plaster” statue to the main temple building of Wat Chotanaram in Bangkok, but that fell into despair and the statue, still in plaster, was then moved to the nearby Wat Traimit, a pagoda of minor relevance.

For 20 years it was kept under a tin roof until a building was made for it. When they tried to move it, they discovered its true identity.

The statue was actually nine parts that fit together, and a key was also found in the plaster that unlocked the parts for easy transportation. I’m sure the people who had to move it previously were rolling in their graves after that was discovered.

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China has banned reincarnation unless the government preapproves how you plan on being reborn!

Not only does this epitomize government control going overboard, it also is much more devious than it seems. You’re probably thinking the entire thing is ludicrous.

How could a government decide what happens to you in the next life? And on the surface that is how it comes across, but in reality it's purpose is to curb the influence of the Dalai Lama!

Because Buddhist monks are now banned from reincarnating without government permission, the Chinese government will technically know where the next Dalai Lama will be born.

If, for example, someone comes forward later and claims to be the new Dalai Lama, the government can simply say, “Sorry! Our records don’t seem to indicate that!” Which divides the leadership of Tibetan Buddhism.

The current Dalai Lama has lived in India since 1959 and claims he will not be born in Tibet in the future to escape Chinese oppression!

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Unlike most places, Woman in Algeria are more successful than men, making up 70% of lawyers, 60% of judges and more!

Unlike most places, Woman in Algeria are more successful than men!

Algeria is the largest country in Africa and 35th in world population. The country has a population of nearly 38 million after having less than 5 million at the start of the 20th century.

About 90% of Algerians live in the northern, coastal area; the inhabitants of the Sahara desert are mainly concentrated in oases, although some 1.5 million remain nomadic or partly nomadic. 28.1% of Algerians are under the age of 15.

The population is fairly split between men and women, with women making up only about one percent more than men.

Women fare a lot better here than in most places. Women make up 70% of the country's lawyers and 60% of its judges.

They also dominate the medical field and make up 60% of university students. Women are also increasingly contributing more to household income than men.

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The company that owned the World Trade Center had scheduled a meeting for 9/11/2001 on the 88th floor of tower 1 to discuss what to do in the event of a terrorist attack, but rescheduled the night be

September 11th was a devastating time in the United States and around the world. I

t is, of course, most important to recognize the people who lost their lives that day, but there were other effects as well.

For one, what happens with the people who owned the buildings? The Port Authority owned the World Trade Center buildings but were in the process of selling them at the time of the attacks.

The new owners were actually supposed to meet in one of the buildings on September 11th to discuss what would happen in the event of a terrorist attack.

The meeting was cancelled the day before because one of the participants couldn’t make it.

Luckily, the site was insured, as overall damages were in the trillions. The attacks cost insurance companies $39.5 billion, including property, business interruption, aviation, workers’ compensation, life and liability insurance claim costs.

About two thirds of these losses were paid for by reinsurers, companies that provide insurance for insurers.

For some perspective, the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing resulted in insured losses of $125 million and the Los Angeles riots of 1992 resulted in insured losses of $775 million.

At the time, September 11th was the costliest disaster in American history. It was surpassed a few years later by Hurricane Katrina.

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